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Question for Kiki: Spinning & WR
02-02-2014, 11:21 PM
Post: #1
Question for Kiki: Spinning & WR
Hopefully you'll see this question Kiki. I didn't want to high jack your "Tales of a Sausage Girl" thread with a question unrelated to your journey (awesome thread by the way!).

In one of your posts you mentioned that your weight went up after spinning due to water retention (yes I've read every single word on your threads! blushing). I spin twice a week, with one of them the day before a rest day, which is also my weigh in day. I've never understood why I didn't see any downward movement (sometime have gone up) on the scale, especially after such a high calorie burn. d'oh

Based on all of the awesome info on this site, I've learnt that muscles will retain water after lifting, but didn't realize this was the case for cardio also? I love spinning, so I won't give it up, although I would consider just one class/wk.

Can you share your wisdom on cardio & wr? If there's anyone else in the EM2WL fam who can shed light on this, it would also be greatly appreciated!
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02-07-2014, 08:37 AM
Post: #2
RE: Question for Kiki: Spinning & WR
Hey! So awesome that you caught that! LOL. I didn't even realize that I said it in there, but..yep, it's true wink

Cardio is kind of a catch 22 when it comes to water retention. Many times it can be used to relieve it, but the type/intensity of cardio matters.

Cardio like HIIT, sprints, stair-master, or even cycling/running/walking with resistance or on an incline can contribute to water retention in the legs.

It's simply because exercises using resistance will stimulate the leg muscles to some degree, and with spinning (classes, esp) you typically are using different levels of resistance, and going for a higher intensity burn. Cardio is typically considered "aerobic" - with oxygen. The higher the intensity of your workout, you incorporate some anaerobic (meaning: without oxygen) properties, which cause your body to respond in a way similar to how it would with weight lifting. This is great as far as the post exercise calorie burning factor, but the lack of oxygen to the muscles is what causes the lactic acid build up (swelling, water retention to the affected area).

I often use my spin bike to *relieve* retention in the legs from leg day. In order to do this, I use very little resistance on the flywheel, and move at a low-med intensity. This would also be the case for most other cardio. You can use the treadmill on an incline and do sprints (anaerobic), or flat and steady state (aerobic).

Ramble in a nutshell: rambling

The higher the intensity, and the more muscle involved = higher post exercise cal burn, fat burn, and water retention.

The lower the intensity, and the less muscle involved = cals burned during workout only, and flushing of lactic acid retention.

This is why it's nice to incorporate both, as they will both have completely different benefits. happy

Hope that helped!

Great question, btw.

Kiki (aka rambling )
EM2WL.com
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02-07-2014, 05:53 PM
Post: #3
RE: Question for Kiki: Spinning & WR
(02-07-2014 08:37 AM)Kiki Wrote:  Hey! So awesome that you caught that! LOL. I didn't even realize that I said it in there, but..yep, it's true wink

Cardio is kind of a catch 22 when it comes to water retention. Many times it can be used to relieve it, but the type/intensity of cardio matters.

Cardio like HIIT, sprints, stair-master, or even cycling/running/walking with resistance or on an incline can contribute to water retention in the legs.

It's simply because exercises using resistance will stimulate the leg muscles to some degree, and with spinning (classes, esp) you typically are using different levels of resistance, and going for a higher intensity burn. Cardio is typically considered "aerobic" - with oxygen. The higher the intensity of your workout, you incorporate some anaerobic (meaning: without oxygen) properties, which cause your body to respond in a way similar to how it would with weight lifting. This is great as far as the post exercise calorie burning factor, but the lack of oxygen to the muscles is what causes the lactic acid build up (swelling, water retention to the affected area).

I often use my spin bike to *relieve* retention in the legs from leg day. In order to do this, I use very little resistance on the flywheel, and move at a low-med intensity. This would also be the case for most other cardio. You can use the treadmill on an incline and do sprints (anaerobic), or flat and steady state (aerobic).

Ramble in a nutshell: rambling

The higher the intensity, and the more muscle involved = higher post exercise cal burn, fat burn, and water retention.

The lower the intensity, and the less muscle involved = cals burned during workout only, and flushing of lactic acid retention.

This is why it's nice to incorporate both, as they will both have completely different benefits. happy

Hope that helped!

Great question, btw.

Thanks Kiki, this is helpful! I do use spinning to relieve soreness, and get the fat burn (plus it's fun!). I'll try using lower intensity for soreness, and continue spinning, but switch my weigh in day to avoid the water retention showing up on the scale.
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