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Hi there!
12-10-2016, 09:07 PM
Post: #1
Hi there!
I've been reading everything on the site for the past couple of weeks and decided it's time to say hello.

My (basic) story...I'll be 64 in a couple of weeks. I'm a writer, so spend lots of time on my butt, which got bigger and bigger over about 3 years filled with lots of deadlines. At 218# I knew I had to do something. I'm 5'3", currently 146#.

I lost 73 pounds between Feb. 2015 and Aug. 2016 doing Weight Watchers initially, then what I think of as "modified WW." I plateaued (surprise!) about 5 months in and, since I was also tracking religiously on MFP, I knew the calorie equivalent of WW points was VERY low, so I increased my calories to around 1400 per MFP (still, I've learned, very low). I also did a lot of walking, started some running (C25K first, then my own interval system), joined a gym and swam laps 2-3 times a week + weights 3 times a week. Sadly, they doubled their membership fee and I quit a few months ago, but am looking for another gym for weight training.

Anyway, knowing that many people (including myself in the past) regain lost weight, I've been reading a lot about metabolism over the past year. I happily stumbled upon EM2WL not long ago and I'm working on getting up to my TDEE. But...

I've been training for a half-marathon I'm supposed to run in late February. I do one long interval run a week (varies, but 90-150 min), one long walk a week (6-8 mi), 2 short interval runs (30 min), 2 40-60 min walks, one recovery day. I'm not currently doing any systematic weight training, but I think about it. wink

I am currently eating 1800/day, aiming for at least 2300 based on TDEE with exercise set to "very strenuous." I'm increasing slowly, partly because I'm finding it challenging to eat so much (who'd a thunk it?) and partly because I'd like to minimize (re)gains. Ultimately I'd like to lose another 15 pounds, but I'm in no hurry and REALLY want to get my metabolism back in order.

I'm wondering whether I should forget the half marathon (I could run a 5K or 10K that day instead). I'm not really a dedicated runner, but I'm very goal oriented, and I thought the training would be a good way to stay active and maintain. But the more I learn, the more misguided that seems. So feedback would be appreciated. (And I hope this wasn't the wrong place to ask about this - still learning!).

Thank you so much for this fantastic site - I've shared it widely!

Sheila
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12-10-2016, 11:25 PM
Post: #2
RE: Hi there!
Hi Sheila, Great to see you here and to read your story.

My personal experience is that distance running didn't do anything to keep my weight in check - and I was still doing weight sessions as well. Some people are lucky in that it works for them though - maybe you are one of them.

I found that weights and HIIT which is interval running works great for me. In fact that and keeping protein at a good level is what seems to make keeping a consistent weight more accessible for me.

A 5 km race would probably work well. You could work more on speed and so do more interval (HIIT) work and weights and still keep your goal of running a race.

Long distance running was a bit addictive for me. I would run more - eat more - then run more!!! Not so good.

Looking forward to reading your progress :-)

(I am not a writer and notice that I don't articulate my thoughts so well when I read something back a day or two later so I apologise if it doesn't read very well Undecided )
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12-11-2016, 12:17 AM (This post was last modified: 12-11-2016 12:18 AM by sheilawrites.)
Post: #3
RE: Hi there!
(12-10-2016 11:25 PM)FionaSchipke Wrote:  Hi Sheila, Great to see you here and to read your story.

My personal experience is that distance running didn't do anything to keep my weight in check - and I was still doing weight sessions as well. Some people are lucky in that it works for them though - maybe you are one of them.

I found that weights and HIIT which is interval running works great for me. In fact that and keeping protein at a good level is what seems to make keeping a consistent weight more accessible for me.

A 5 km race would probably work well. You could work more on speed and so do more interval (HIIT) work and weights and still keep your goal of running a race.

Long distance running was a bit addictive for me. I would run more - eat more - then run more!!! Not so good.

Looking forward to reading your progress :-)

(I am not a writer and notice that I don't articulate my thoughts so well when I read something back a day or two later so I apologise if it doesn't read very well Undecided )

Thanks, Fiona. Your reply reads fine to me!
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12-11-2016, 12:46 AM
Post: #4
RE: Hi there!
Hello Sheila, welcome here!

Running is fun and is something that you should do because you like and enjoy, not with the expectation of becoming leaner. Sure it increases your TDEE and is a great way to start towards a more fit lifestyle, but eventually the body will adjust to running and will become more efficient at it, burning less calories (which defeats the purpose of running to keep the weight off).
Also endurance and cardio only will not help you build metabolic expensive muscle. The body will do what it needs to stay in balance and handle the exercise easier.

The first thing is to decide if you want to do the half marathon or not. If you want to do it, there's nothing wrong with it and will be a huge acomplishment, but you will not firmer and "more toned" once you do it. You could add resistance training, but I wonder if it would end up being too much. If you choose to run it anyway, I'd suggest to change you workout focus to strength training once you do the run and recover from it.

You can definitely start strength training with body weight workouts at home, park workouts (if outdoor isn't too cold where you live) or even start gathering some affordable equipment to workout at home.

This pin links to a journey story talking about marathon running and muscle loss http://pin.it/sCW7Y-q

Tereza Toledobig grin lovestruck
Team EM2WL
Certified EM2WL Personal Trainer and Coach
Here is my journey: http://eatmore2weighless.com/tereza/
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12-11-2016, 06:00 PM
Post: #5
RE: Hi there!
Thanks, Tereza! Since it's less than 2 months away and I'd really like to have run a half, I'm going to continue training for now and add a little weight training, to be increased after the half. One last Q to be sure I'm reading correctly... The difference between my BMR and TDEE is about 600 calories. Do I understand correctly that on days when I burn more than 600 (2 days a week), I should eat the extra calories? For instance, if I burn 700, I should add 100 to my goal that day? I'm not yet at TDEE as I'm adding 100 every 2 weeks (seems to take that long for the small increase in weight to level out). Is that right?
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12-19-2016, 09:20 PM
Post: #6
RE: Hi there!
Hi Sheila and welcome! I'm just a newbie, but from what I've read here, your TDEE calculation already factors in your weekly exercise. So no need to eat added calories on exercise days.

How about starting a journal so we can follow your progress? I'm about your size, so I'd be interested to see how things go for you!
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12-20-2016, 05:31 PM
Post: #7
RE: Hi there!
Hi Sheila,

Actually, you are correct...you never want to eat below your BMR, so on those two days you would want to eat back the difference of 100 calories. In general, the TDEE factors in your weekly exercise but this is a special circumstance. I'm not sure what your calculated BMR is or where you currently stand on your increase to TDEE (if you're still at 1800)...but at your current calorie and activity level, you're probably under BMR a lot of days...just the nature of the beast as you're increasing so you'll want to get to your TDEE as quickly as is comfortable for you.

For now, you could vary your calories slightly so that you are eating a little bit less (maybe 25-50 calories) on your lower activity days, less (50-100 calories) on your rest day, and add those calories to your two high burn days so that you're still averaging whatever your goal calories are. Not necessary, but may help if you find you are really hungry on some days and not so much on others. As you get closer to your TDEE, changing up calories not really required except for those 2 high burn days. But, take it slow if you are finding it takes about 2 weeks to stabilize before you increase, keep that schedule. You'll get there eventually.
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12-30-2016, 07:42 PM
Post: #8
RE: Hi there!
(12-19-2016 09:20 PM)Frosty Wrote:  Hi Sheila and welcome! I'm just a newbie, but from what I've read here, your TDEE calculation already factors in your weekly exercise. So no need to eat added calories on exercise days.

How about starting a journal so we can follow your progress? I'm about your size, so I'd be interested to see how things go for you!

Thanks, Frosty. I am about to start my journal - stand by! big grin

I wasn't concerned about adding calories for regular exercise, just the days of my long runs when calories burned exceed my BMR-TDEE. So far, so good!
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12-30-2016, 07:45 PM
Post: #9
RE: Hi there!
(12-20-2016 05:31 PM)hannah77 Wrote:  Hi Sheila,

Actually, you are correct...you never want to eat below your BMR, so on those two days you would want to eat back the difference of 100 calories. In general, the TDEE factors in your weekly exercise but this is a special circumstance. I'm not sure what your calculated BMR is or where you currently stand on your increase to TDEE (if you're still at 1800)...but at your current calorie and activity level, you're probably under BMR a lot of days...just the nature of the beast as you're increasing so you'll want to get to your TDEE as quickly as is comfortable for you.

For now, you could vary your calories slightly so that you are eating a little bit less (maybe 25-50 calories) on your lower activity days, less (50-100 calories) on your rest day, and add those calories to your two high burn days so that you're still averaging whatever your goal calories are. Not necessary, but may help if you find you are really hungry on some days and not so much on others. As you get closer to your TDEE, changing up calories not really required except for those 2 high burn days. But, take it slow if you are finding it takes about 2 weeks to stabilize before you increase, keep that schedule. You'll get there eventually.


Thanks, Hannah77. I'm about to start a journal, but will say I'm up to 2000 now, with more on high-burn days. Now off to start journaling!
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